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ROBERT STEPHEN PARRY


Historical Fiction

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John Donne’s Romantic poem The Good-Morrow. A state of oneness


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Transcript of Video - The Good-Morrow


I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I

Did, till we loved? were we not weaned till then?

But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?

Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den?

'Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.

If ever any beauty I did see,

Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee.


And now good morrow to our waking souls,

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love, all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room an everywhere.

Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,

Let maps to others, worlds on worlds have shown,

Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.


My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,

And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;

Where can we find two better hemispheres,

Without sharp North, without declining West?

Whatever dies was not mixed equally;

If our two loves be one, or, thou and I

Love so alike that none do slacken, none can die.

Background - a brief biography of the poet John Donne


Background biography

Insights & Themes

#themes

The Good-Morrow, insights, themes and ideas for interpretation


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Complete text

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A love poem from the 17th century

Technical info’

Type of Poem = though sometimes termed a 'sonnet,' the poem is very unlike most regular sonnet forms, being in this instance 3 stanzas of 7 lines each.

Rhyme Scheme = AB AB CCC

Meter = mostly iambic pentameter (that is 5 pairs of unstressed and stressed syllables per line) but concluding each stanza in iambic hexameter (six pairs of unstressed and stressed syllables per line)

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