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ROBERT STEPHEN PARRY


Historical Fiction

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Wordsworth’s sonnet Composed upon Westminster Bridge

Transcript of Video - Composed Upon Westminster Bridge


Earth has (hath) not anything to show more fair:

Dull would he be of soul who could pass by

A sight so touching in its majesty:

This City now doth, like a garment, wear


The beauty of the morning: silent, bare,

Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie

Open unto the fields, and to the sky;

All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.


Never did sun more beautifully steep

In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;

Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!


The river glideth at his own sweet will:

Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;

And all that mighty heart is lying still!

Background - a brief biography of the poet William Wordsworth

Insights, themes and ideas for interpretation



Complete text

Background biography

Insights & Themes

#Insights
Poetry Readings logo with quill and heart shapesPoetry Readings logo with quill and heart shapestext link with brown background to historical fiction home pagePoet Wordsworth in contemplative mood, hand on side of head, glancing downward


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Lines capturing a special moment of stillness

Technical info’

Type of Poem = a Petrachian, or Italian sonnet - that is, 14 lines compiled of an octave (8-line stanza) and sestet (6 lines).

Rhyme Scheme = abba, abba, cd, cd, cd

Meter = iambic pentameter.

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