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ROBERT STEPHEN PARRY


Historical Fiction

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Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare


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Transcript of Sonnet 18


Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:


Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;


But thy eternal summer shall not fade,

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:


So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Insights, themes and ideas for interpretation



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Insights & Themes

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Technical info’

Type of Poem = Shakespearean Sonnets have 14 lines in which a particular theme or idea develops and alters, reaching a sometimes surprising or thought-provoking conclusion.

Stanzas =  three 4-line stanzas and then a final couplet (2 rhyming lines at the end)

Rhyme Scheme = ABAB CDCD EFEF GG.

Meter = iambic pentameter (made up of 5 stressed and 5 unstressed syllables on each line).

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Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

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